Drilling into the WebRTC Dataset

24/07/2017

Knowledge=Power. Which is why the WebRTC Dataset might be just what you need.

A Quick History Lesson

You see numbers flying around about WebRTC all the time. One of them is the number of vendors using WebRTC. 1,200 might sound familiar in that context. Well… it comes from the WebRTC Dataset that I am maintaining.

It all started ages ago. I think it was Alan Quayle who made a shortlist of the companies that were using WebRTC that he knew about. That was somewhere in 2012. Which made me start my own Excel sheet. Which was then converted into a Google sheet. Which was then converted into a whole operation of how to find, catalog and update a dataset.

The reason? One of the main companies who are influencers in WebRTC wanted access to it and were willing to pay, so I made it into a product. Since then it had a few more customers who got exclusive ongoing access to this dataset, and now, I decided to repackage it in a different fashion, making it more accessible to more companies.

What’s in the WebRTC Dataset?

The WebRTC Dataset itself is a collection of vendors and projects who are making use of WebRTC in one way or another. It can be anything from a healthcare service to an outsourcing vendor to a live streaming service or a contact center.

The list includes today around 1,200 vendors and counting – it grows and gets updated on a monthly basis.

You’ll find in the dataset vendors large and small. Anything from Google, Cisco and Facebook to small startups and even individual projects that are popular or interesting enough.

You’ll find there acquisitions made in the industry, with reasons behind them and my own indication of how related they are to WebRTC.

You’ll find there vendors who have shut down. Those who have pivoted and changed their focus.

When the information is publicly known, available or can be found online – the suppliers that are used by a vendor are also indicated.

Here’s an example vendor’s information from the WebRTC Dataset:

The page is split into several parts:

  1. The top part, where general information about the company/project can be found. Including things like size, ranking, status and external sources such as Crunchbase
  2. Then there’s the verbal description and notes, which gets updated through time as the offering evolves
  3. After that, different classifications. These are parameters that you can easily use to filter out or find similarly typed vendors in the dataset
  4. Then come links from other sources as well as my own blog and the latest tweets from that vendor
  5. Last but not least, a quick form in the end allows you to ask anything you have about this vendor and get direct answers from me

Where does this data come from?

All over the web.

Since I am actively working on projects like WebRTC Index and WebRTC Weekly, I got to keep tabs with anything related to WebRTC. I go over the blogs of all the vendors using WebRTC and investigate anything that looks like RTC that I bump into in whatever it is that I am reading. On top of that, I use additional sources like Google Alerts and a few other trade secrets 😉

And I’ve been doing this since 2013.

The data in the WebRTC Dataset got created along the way. First as a resource for me to use whenever I need research information on certain domains. And then because it made sense to package it as a distinct product of its own.

Whatever is on the WebRTC Dataset it is something you can go and find out on your own. But it will take you time. Lots and lots of time.

What can you DO With the WebRTC Dataset?

Lots of things actually. It all depends on what it is you’re trying to gain.

Here are a few ideas and uses that people have been using it for already:

  1. Mark potential companies as leads for your salespeople – if you have a cool solution or service that can fit a certain segment, then you can find some interesting companies who might be interested in what you have to offer in this dataset
  2. Check out your competitors – find who they are. See who their known customers are. Compare them to your own company
  3. Find target markets and their size – need to decide where to put your focus? Should it be Healthcare or should it be Education? Should you offer a click to dial button as a service or go for a video chat widget instead? Who are the competitors in the niche you’re trying to carve for yourself? What are they doing?
  4. Understand market trends – here’s what Serge Lachapelle, who was Group Product Manager at Google heading their WebRTC efforts, had to say of the time he used the WebRTC Dataset:

The dataset enables me to understand where the WebRTC platform is going and make strategic roadmap decisions based on where the innovation and heavy usage lies. Being able to get an updated complete view of the market at any given point in time over a large set of criteria makes it easy to see trends in different industries and verticals that make use of WebRTC.

I am sure you’ll be able to find other ways to use it if you only think about it.

And me?

I use this WebRTC Dataset all the time. One of the things I use it for is my annual “WebRTC State of the Market” infographic.

Here’s the one for 2016 and the one for 2017 that I created.

How about a sneak peak?

If you want to see how the WebRTC Dataset feels like to use, then here’s a short video:

I’m interested. Now what?

Access to the WebRTC Dataset comes at $2,400.

The WebRTC Dataset access gives you 1 month of access to all the vendors there. You’ll be able to download the main worksheet and use it after that month is up.

You can decide to purchase it at any point in time, just head to the WebRTC Dataset page.

While we’re at it – if you decide to purchase before the end of July (even if you plan on using it later on), there’s an early bird discount of $400. Just use coupon code DATASET-EARLYBIRD.

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