Get trained to be your company’s WebRTC guy

26/03/2018

Demand for WebRTC developers is stronger than supply.

My inbox is filled with requests for experienced WebRTC developers on a daily basis. It ranges from entrepreneurs looking for a technical partner, managers searching for outsourcing vendors to help them out. My only challenge here is that developers and testers who know a thing or two about WebRTC are hard to find. Finding developers who are aware of the media stack in WebRTC, and not just dabbled into using a github “hello world” demo – these are truly rare.

This is why I created my WebRTC course almost 2 years ago. The idea was to try and share my knowledge and experience around VoIP, media processing and of course WebRTC, with people who need it. This WebRTC training has been a pleasant success, with over 200 people who took it already. And now it is time for the 4th round of office hours for this course.

Who is this WebRTC training for?

This WebRTC course is for anyone who is using WebRTC in his daily work directly or indirectly. Developers, testers, software architects and product managers will be those who benefit from it the most.

It has been designed to give you the information necessary from the ground up.

If you are clueless about VoIP and networking, then this course will guide you through the steps needed to get to WebRTC. Explaining what TCP and UDP are, how HTTP and WebSockets fit on top of it, going to the acronyms used by WebRTC (SRTP, STUN, TURN and many others).

If you have VoIP knowledge and experience, then this course will cover the missing parts – where WebRTC fits into your world, and what to take special attention to, assuming a VoIP background (WebRTC brings with it a different mindset to the development process).

What I didn’t want to do, is have a course that is so focused on the specification that: (1) it becomes irrelevant the moment the next Chrome browser is released; (2) it doesn’t explain the ecosystem around WebRTC or give you design patterns of common use cases. Which is why I baked into the course a lot of materials around higher level media processing, the WebRTC ecosystem and common architectures in WebRTC.

TL;DR – if you follow this blog and find it useful, then this course is for you.

Why take it?

The question should be why not?

There are so many mistakes and bad decisions I see companies doing with WebRTC. From deciding how to model their media routes, to where to place their TURN servers (or configure them). Through how to design scale out, to which open source frameworks to pick. Such mistakes end up a lot more expensive than any online course would ever be.

In April, next month, I will be starting the next round of office hours.

While the course is pre-recorded and available online, I conduct office hours for a span of 3-4 months twice a year. In these live office hours I go through parts of the course, share new content and answer any questions.

What does it include?

The course includes:

  • 40+ lessons split into 7 different modules with an additional bonus module
  • 15 hours of video content, along with additional links for extra reading material
  • Several e-books available only as part of the course, like how the Jitsi team scales Jitsi Meet, and what are sought after characteristics in WebRTC developers
  • A private online forum
  • The office hours

In the past two months I’ve been working on refreshing some of the content, getting it up to date with recent developments. We’ve seen Edge and Safari introducing WebRTC during that time for example. These updated lessons will be updated in the course before the official launch.

When can I start?

Whenever you want. In April, I will be officially launching the office hours for this course round. At that point in time, the updated lessons will be part of the course.

What more, there will be a new lesson added – this one about WebRTC 1.0. Philipp Hancke was kind enough to host this lesson with me as a live webinar (free to attend live) that will become an integral lesson in the course.

If you are interested in joining this lesson live:

What if I am not ready?

You can always take it later on, but I won’t be able to guarantee pricing or availability of the office hours at that point in time.

If you plan on doing anything with WebRTC in the next 6 months, you should probably enroll today.

And by the way – if you need to come as a team to up the knowledge and experience in WebRTC in your company, then there are corporate plans for the course as well.

CONTENT UPGRADE: If you are serious about learning WebRTC, then check out my online WebRTC training:

Responses

Vendela says:
March 26, 2018

Hey! Awesome post, but I’d love it if you could change the headline to “Get trained to be your company’s WebRTC person” or something else more gender neutral. Thanks!

Reply
    Tsahi Levent-Levi says:
    March 26, 2018

    Oops…

    You are correct.

    Three problems on my end which are totally mine:

    1. I am a “guy”, which means when I think this is how my thought processes work, and I try to write the same way I think
    2. My native language is Hebrew and not English, and while gender neutrality exist in both they are slightly different in how they manifest themselves in the written language
    3. This article started off from a title I found on a different post somewhere. And all I did was rename Cisco to WebRTC…

    Will definitely try to do better in the future – I am all for equality.

    Reply

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